5 Reasons Why You Have Cloudy Pool Water after Shock (and How to Fix It)

Reasons Why You Have Cloudy Pool Water after Shock

5 Reasons Why You Have Cloudy Pool Water after Shock (and How to Fix It)

5 Reasons Why You Have Cloudy Pool Water after Shock (and How to Fix It) 

Picture this. You just had your friends over for a pool party. After the party, you decided to dump some chlorine in the pool to shock it. But, to your surprise, you discover the next day that, instead of a clean pool you have cloudy pool water after shock.  read more…

In most cases, cloudy pool water after shock is just a reaction to the pool shock treatment. When pool chemicals are out of balance or when mineral levels are high, adding a massive dose of chlorine can cause a chain reaction.
There are many reasons why you have cloudy pool water after shock. This article will teach you how to identify the causes and fix them.

           1. Filter Problems

Many people believe that shocking a pool is enough to clear the water. But, pool water needs to be filtered and will not clear up if your filter doesn’t work properly. It doesn’t matter how much shock you dump in your pool. If your filter works poorly, you will get cloudy water.

           2. High Level of Calcium Harness

Another mistake people make when shocking a pool is not taking into account the hardness of the water in their area. Here’s an example. If you live in an area where tap water has more than 500 ppm of hardness, and you use Calcium Hypochlorite for pool shock, you are, in fact, adding 5 ppm for each pound of chemical used. Make sure to keep the harness levels between 120 to 220 ppm to avoid cloudy pool water after shock.

           3. High pH Levels

There’s a lot of science involved in shocking a pool. High levels of the wrong chemicals can cause water to turn cloudy or milky after shock. For instance, if your pH level is above 7.6, then you’ve wasted half of the chlorine. That’s why it’s best to use a low pH range (somewhere between 7.2 and 7.4) when shocking your pool.

           4. High CYA Levels

Cyanuric Acid, also known as CYA or Stabilizer) is one of the most common chemicals used for the prevention of chlorine loss by protecting it from the sun’s ultraviolet rays. However, too much cyanuric acid can cause water to turn cloudy after shock. The best way to reduce the cyanuric acid in pool water is to replace a portion of the pool water with fresh water. Also, test your cyanuric acid level every month to make sure it’s less than 50 ppm.

          5. You Don’t Use a Pool Clarifier

A pool clarifier collects the microscopic particles that are causing your pool water to turn milky and binds them together to create larger particles that your filter can absorb. Using a pool clarifier after shocking the pool is essential to keeping the water clean and clear.
In most cases, cloudy pool water after shock is only temporary and will clean up itself overnight. To keep your pool water clear, make sure that the chemicals are balanced and you have a proper functioning filter.
MAINTAINING YOUR POOL IS PARAMOUNT FOR YOUR POOL’S HEALTH. IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS ABOUT YOUR POOL OR IN NEED OF SERVICE GIVE US A CALL AT 623-939-1346. YOU CAN ALSO COME VISIT US AT OUR RETAIL STORE AND ONE OF OUR POOL CARE PROFESSIONALS WILL BE HAPPY TO HELP!
ENJOY YOUR POOL, AND LET US HELP YOU ALWAYS KEEP IT CLEAR AND SWIM READY!
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